HOLSTERS

WAFFENFABRIK - TSHSE S.A.

A handgun holster is a device used to hold or restrict the undesired movement of a handgun, most commonly in a location where it can be easily withdrawn for immediate use. Holsters are often attached to a belt or waistband, but they may be attached to other locations of the body (e.g., the ankle holster). Holsters vary in the degree to which they secure or protect the firearm. Some holsters for law enforcement officers have a strap over the top of the holster to make the handgun less likely to fall out of the holster or harder for another person to grab the gun. Some holsters have a flap over the top to protect the gun from the elements.

Holsters are generally designed to offer protection to the handgun, secure its retention, and provide ready access to it. The need for ready access is often at odds with the need for security and protection, so the user must consider the individual's needs. Choosing the right balance can be very important, especially in the case of a defensive weapon holster, where failure to access the weapon quickly or damage or loss of the weapon due to insufficient retention or protection could result in serious injury or death to the user.

Holsters are generally designed to be used with one hand, allowing the handgun to be removed and/or replaced with the same hand. To be able to return the handgun to its holster one-handed, the holster must be made from stiff material that holds its shape so that the holster won't collapse when the object is no longer inside to give it support.

Holsters are generally attached to a person's belt or waistband or clipped to another article of clothing. Some holsters, such as ankle holsters, have integrated support. Other holsters may fit inside a pocket, to add stability and protection to the handgun, keeping it more reliably secure and accessible than if it were in the pocket alone.

Holsters are generally worn in a location where they can be readily accessible. Common locations are: at the waist (outside (OWB) or inside (IWB) the waistband), behind the back (small of back (SOB)), at the ankle, at the chest (in an elastic belly band or shoulder holster), or on the upper thigh. Holsters are sometimes contained in an external bag, such as a purse or fanny pack.


Level 1 “Passive Retention”: Level 1 holsters have passive tension from an adjustable detent screw that provides tension on the trigger guard. ... Level 3 Thumb-Activated Pivot Guard: A Level 3 holster encompasses the same features as the Level 1 and 2 holsters, but with the addition of the pivot guard.


Level Four retention holster: a Level Four holster has three retention devices in addition to passive retention for a total of four retention mechanisms. These are much rarer than Level III holsters and are essentially the ultimate in holster retention.


What is PASSIVE RETENTION? When a company unexpectedly retains risk leading to losses. This usually occurs when they are not properly managing their reserves or self insurance. Refer to retention and risk retention.


Usually, retained risks occur with greater frequency, but have a lower severity. An insurance deductible is a common example of risk retention to save money, since a deductible is a limited risk that can save money on insurance premiums for larger risks. ... Hence, speeding is a form of passive risk retention.


ADVERTISEMENTS: In other words the retention of risk means one is liable to bear the losses himself up to the amount retained. May be it is done to keep the cost of insurance premium at the minimum level.

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